Guide to Local Policing

For non-emergency calls, dial 101

Ulceby is generally a very low crime area. We are served by a number of dedicated PCSOs and police officers based at the Barton-on-Humber police station.

Did you know? 101 is the best number to call when you want to contact your local police - when it's less urgent than 999. It's available 24 hours a day, seven days a week.

Examples of 101 calls:

  • if your car has been stolen
  • if your property has been damaged
  • if you suspect drug use or dealing in your local area
  • to report a minor traffic accident
  • to give the police information about crime in your area
  • to speak to the police about a general enquiry

The Police request that, where possible, people report crimes themselves on 101 and please do not ask Parish Councillors to do this on their behalf.

In our experience, sometimes you can get straight though on 101, but at peak times (eg Saturday night) there can be delays before you manage to speak to anyone.

Ferry Policing

Ulceby is part of North Lincolnshire Council's Ferry ward. More details of our local Police (Ferry) team can be found at Humberside Police Ferry page.

You can also Email the local Police Neighbourhood Team:

SPOCCommunitiesNorthLincolnshire@humberside.pnn.police.uk

Please ensure Emails are brief and focus sensibly on specific problems. Please remember that our PCSOs and police officers work shifts. They do read every Email and will attempt to respond as soon as they can. They may even turn up on your doorstep at short notice, or it might take a little more time.

Remember that reports go into Barton's logs which are monitored in order to identify any local trends and decide what action to take. That's why it's important to report crime and not simply shrug it off.

Our local Police officers have had an impact on under-age alcohol usage, antisocial behaviour and e.g. illegal mini motorcycle usage as well as dealing with much more serious crimes including serious woundings. Serious incidents are very rare and extra resources from Scunthorpe are available if the local police need them.

 

Be vigilant!

Unsophisticated low-level crime by opportunists is an ever-present risk, meaning everyone should watch out for:

  • DISTRACTION THEFTS
  • SNEAK-IN THEFTS
  • ROAD SIGN & METAL THEFTS - ROOF LEADING, FLASHING etc
  • CABLE THEFTS - BOGUS ELECTRICITY WORK CREWS
  • CAST IRON GRATE THEFTS

Distraction Thefts

The Police advise everyone to guard against unsolicited doorstep callers who try to distract your attention while an accomplice steals belongings like purses, wallets, credit cards, cash, mobile phones etc. -- anything of value that is easily pocketed and turned into cash is susceptible.

The elderly are particularly vulnerable to such exploits so please ensure that elderly relatives and neighbours are aware of this trend.

Sneak-In Thefts

We've all done it - leaving a back door or window open while we're sunning ourselves in the garden or pottering around in the garden shed. This gives opportunistic sneak-in thieves a chance to nip in and pocket your small valuables. You might not even notice they've gone. So keep an eye out and ensure your personal property is safely kept out of sight and under lock and key if necessary. Don't put temptation their way.

During summertime, be wary of leaving windows open during warm evenings or overnight, as this is an open invitation to thieves.

 

 

When to use 999 instead?

  • a crime is in progress
  • someone suspected of a crime is nearby
  • there is danger to life
  • violence is being used or threatened.

If elderly or infirm people are worried the Police WILL NOT MIND AT ALL if you call them on 999 to report any crimes.


 

Handy web links

POLICE UK - plenty of advice and information

Humberside Police web site

Humberside Police Ferry

Local Crime and Policing (Police UK) - crime map

Crimestoppers - share information about crime anonymously

Action Fraud - help with fraud and reporting cyber crime

 

 

Please note information is given in good faith and is believed correct at the time of writing (18/10/2016). It helps if you can notify us of any broken or outdated links.